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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
. the u.s. trade gap narrows as the world buys more made in america products and the u.s. buys less foreign oil. >> susie: and with gas prices rising, chevy hopes its new diesel chevy cruze will attract buyers looking for more miles per gallon. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r." >> susie: millions of people are bracing tonight for a powerful snow storm that could cripple the east coast. some forecasters say this could be the blizzard of the century with record amounts of snow and extremely strong winds. in parts of the northeast, transportation was shut down. the governors of massachusetts and connecticut declared a state of emergency and banned car travel, train service and cancelled flights in and out of boston. while the worst of the storm has yet to hit, many businesses and cities were busy making preparations today. erika miller reports. >> reporter: this monstrous storm is already being compared to the great blizzard of '78, when vast amounts of snow blanketed the ohio valley and the great lakes. that storm lasted 36 hours, leaving cars stranded. this storm could also b
those retail numbers are a positive sign for the u.s. economy. investors were worried about some not so good signals today about europe's economy. stocks turned negative on comments from europe's central bank president saying the strong euro could dampen europe's recovery. here on wall street, the dow fell 42 points, the nasdaq lost three and the s&p slipped over two points. >> tom: still ahead, douglas burtnick joins us, he's with aberdeen asset management. >> susie: a battle is brewing between a big name hedge fund investor and apple. at issue: how to get apple to unlock value for shareholders. today david einhorn of greenlight capital sued apple to block a move that would stop the use of preferred shares. shareholders will vote on this at apple's annual meeting on february 27. what einhorn is proposing is that apple pay out more of its cash hoard to investors, using a special kind of preferred stock. einhorn has a lot at stake: his fund owns more than one million shares of apple, and while the stock rose a bit today, it's down 35% since its peak of $700 last september. late today app
. >> it is because television. >> hold it eleanor. >> the spectacle has lost a lot of the drama and dignity it used to have. he walks down that aisle and gets slaps and high fives. they should have had beyonce doing her number midway through it. >> every other president has walked down that aisle and i don't recall you complaining about it. >> it has lost dignity. >> ike and fdr didn't look like that. >> it is an american tradition and the fact the numbers were down is partly because people don't watch television like they used to. >> eleanor, how were obama's kneels son ratings -- neilsen ratings, the second lowest since they began taking measurement in 1993. the lowest since 2000 when bill you clinton's last drew an audience of 931.5 million. >> i think neilsen should start rating some of the social media sites and look at the exchanges between people who watched it. the american people who watched that and pick up portions that have, here our president is addressing concerns in their lives. i agree the big topics like the eu trade pac that is very important. but i don't think people in the count
, wall street could use some new headlines to chew on. good economic data would be nice. friendly washington politics would also be helpful. tonight's state of the union speech might give investors a clue as to whether that's likely to happen. veteran trader teddy weissberg is hoping president obama will stress the need for bipartisanship but isn't sure that's what he'll hear. >> in terms of tonight, i don't think anybody that i talk to in the wall street arena expects to hear anything terribly dramatic one way or another. >> reporter: since lawmakers and the white house kicked the proverbial can down the road around new years, the stock market has rallied rather nicely. the s&p 500 is up nearly 7% and the dow is about 150 points away from its all-time high. of course, stocks have been getting help from corporate america, too. it turns out fourth quarter profits were better than expected, led by the housing sector and financial firms. >> about 345 companies have reported so far, of which 70% have beaten earnings expectations and 66% have beaten revenue expectations. both of these
that the people who put food on our tables use food stamps at twice the rate as the rest of the u.s. workforce. meaning that the people who put food on our tables can't afford to put food on their own family's tables. >> funding is provided by carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org. anne gumowitz. the betsy and jesse fink foundation. the hkh foundation. barbara g. fleischman. and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america, designing customized indivi
-- including u.s. government officials who in 2007 publicly stated that problems in the subprime market appeared to be contained." >> reporter: s&p goes on to argue that the securities at issue in the justice department's case were reviewed by another ratings agency and received the same rating. s&p says it also began downgrading many mortgage securities in 2006, warning that conditions in the housing market were deteriorating. but critics say what matters is what s&p claimed at the time it stamped securities triple a. >> the ratings agencies claim that they have unique analytic abilities and very sophisticated models that enable them to determine the credit worthiness of a bond, a derivative, a security. >> reporter: s&p points out court rulings have dismissed what it called challenges to a credit rating made with 20/20 hindsight. if the justice department does sue, standard and poor's says it will vigorously defend itself. darren gersh, "n.b.r.," washington. >> tom: still ahead, tonight's word on the street: consumers, the street.com's david peltier joins us with some consumer product
rain and snow, but not on saturdays. the u.s. postal service is dropping saturday letter deliveries to save billions. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. fresh pain at the pump. american drivers see a steep jump in gas prices: up 15 cents a gallon in the past week alone. >> susie: and the federal reserve says it's been hit, by cyber hackers. we look at u.s. businesses and just how safe their networks are. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the u.s. postal service says this summer it will stop delivering mail on saturdays, ending a service that began 150 years ago. cutting back to a five-day a week schedule will save $2- billion. the post office has been losing about $20 million a day, as e- mail useage ramps up and mail volume plunges. congress has required the post office to deliver six days a week, but the postmaster general believes there is a loophole in the law that will allow him to make the change. darren gersh reports on the business fallout. >> reporter: first class mail is the postal service's most profitable product. it is also a business that is disappearing at the
. that and more tonight on "n.b.r." investors spent much of this week focused on the u.s. market with major market indexes hitting five-year highs. but now the spotlight is shifting overseas. g-20 finance ministers and central bankers are meeting in moscow over the weekend. they will be debating the need for austerity, versus the need to spur growth. no one expects a quick turnaround for the european economy, which has been mired in recession. but as erika miller reports, that may make now a good time to invest. >> reporter: it would makes sense that american investors would be loading up on u.s. stocks with the market here doing so well. but they're not. last week, investors in stock mutual funds put virtually all their cash in international markets. more than $3 billion went into funds holding international stocks. by comparison, mutual funds holding u.s. stocks suffered their first outflows of the year. investment advisors say small investors may be on to something. >> international investing has had a bad reputation over the last couple of years had a bad experience, people have taken money ou
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)